013: Mindfulness and Sexuality

SweetRetreatHeadshot1Natasha Helfer Parker gets a non-Mormon perspective and interviews sex educator, Jennifer “Dr. Jenn” Gunsaullus, Ph.D. on the process of mindfulness and how we can use it to edify our sexual relationships with self and spouse.

Dr. Jenn is a sociologist who works as a sexuality and mindfulness speaker, and a relationship and intimacy counselor. She specializes in helping women, couples, and groups deepen intimacy, strengthen communication, and improve trust and self-expression. Dr. Jenn got her start in the sex and relationship field 19 years ago as a sexual health peer educator at Lehigh University in her home state of Pennsylvania. She now merges her practical training in sexual health and academic training in sociology with her passion for holistic health and mind/body/spirit perspectives.

Dr. Jenn’s Den

Many thanks to The Lower Lights for the beautiful bumper music and to James Estrada of Oak Street Audio for audio production of this podcast.

7 comments for “013: Mindfulness and Sexuality

  1. SILVINA INES MALDINI
    March 6, 2013 at 9:11 am

    REALMENTE ME PARECE EXCELENTE LA ENTREVISTA Y MUY INTERESANTE EL TEMA MINDFULLNESS, LOS FELICITO! UN ORGULLO PODER ESCUCHARLOS DESDE BARILOCHE, ARGENTINA!

    • natashaparker
      March 6, 2013 at 9:18 am

      Gracias Silvina! 🙂

  2. CK
    March 6, 2013 at 11:12 am

    Great, thank you!

  3. December 22, 2013 at 10:42 pm

    I really enjoyed this podcast. I had a thought about the idea of mindfulness and the ironic difficulty of keeping your mind in tune with your body during sex. I’ve been confused for some time as to why so many people (not most by any means, but a significant number) enjoy experiencing pain during sexual activity, as in the case of those who enjoy and engage in BDSM activities. As I was listening to your discussion of mindfulness and how hard it is for some people to get their mind in sync with their bodies in order to fully experience their physical sexuality, I thought that perhaps experiencing pain–the ultimate mind-body synchronizer–facilitates some people’s ability to be “mindful” of their bodies during sexual activity. In other words, it’s kind of like an alternative to meditation as a way to sync your mind up with your body, and that experiencing pain forces the mind to pay attention so that it is focused on the body when the pleasurable experience begins and can thus be more profoundly perceived and appreciated. Any thoughts on that?

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