008: Miscarriage from an LDS Perspective Part 2

195908_10152019380010117_2035783016_nThis interview was recorded about a year ago and I am just getting around to getting it broadcasted.  Thank you Jenni Brighton for your patience!

Jenni was raised in the church as one of nine children and had always planned on having a large family. Her experiences with loss led her to feminism, and feminism and other life experiences led her to a less orthodox way of relating to the church and the world around her. Now she is a childbirth educator, graduate student in psychology, and mother of a few who longs to tell people that in her heart she has more kids than the ones standing beside her.

She is the co-founder of The Amethyst Network, whose mission is “to break the social taboo surrounding talking about miscarriage, and to support, advocate, educate, comfort, and share our stories of loss, grief, and hope.” She also wrote about her miscarriage experiences in “An Almost Invisible Tragedy” in issue 166 of Sunstone Magazine (Winter 2012).  You can find her blog postings on miscarriage at Mindful Serenity.

Part 1 generally focuses on Jenni’s personal experiences with miscarriage while Part 2 gets into specific advice to both women going through miscarriage and family/friends who are part of their support network.

Many thanks to The Lower Lights for the beautiful bumper music and to James Estrada of Oak Street Audio for audio production of this podcast.

1 comment for “008: Miscarriage from an LDS Perspective Part 2

  1. Tredunohm
    February 12, 2013 at 3:18 pm

    This was a great podcast. I have learned more on how to be supportive of others who have experienced a miscarriage. I feel bad that I didn’t connect the dots on how saying D&C can be hurtful. I was in a mission prep class and the teacher made a big deal about using the term D&C saying that we shouldn’t use it because it is a women’s procedure. I didn’t get what the big deal was and that term is used officially for Doctrine and Covenants, so I just ignored it. Thank you for pointing that out so I can be more sensitive and spread awareness to others in the future.

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